Understanding The Types Of Angina

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Overview Of Angina

  • Angina is a condition (a group of symptoms caused by a core health disorder) that is caused when the source of oxygenated blood to the heart becomes limited.
  • The most general sign of angina is chest pain, which is generally activated by physical movement.
  • Most cases of angina are triggered by atherosclerosis, which is a illness where the arteries become tough and thinner, limiting the supply of blood.

Types Of Angina

Angina is a condition (a group of symptoms caused by a core health disorder) that is caused when the source of oxygenated blood to the heart becomes limited.

Angina is a condition (a group of symptoms caused by a core health disorder) that is caused when the source of oxygenated blood to the heart becomes limited.

The two leading types of angina are stable angina and unstable angina.

Stable Angina

  • In instances of stable angina, the symptoms generally develop slowly over time and follow a fixed pattern.
  • For instance, you might only see symptoms when walking up stairs or if you are under a lot of strain.
  • Symptoms generally only last for a couple of minutes and can get better by taking medicine known as glyceryl trinitrate.
  • Stable angina is not fatal on its own. Though, it is a severe warning sign that you have a bigger risk of being subjected to more serious disorders, such as a heart attack or stroke.

Unstable Angina

  • In instances of unstable angina, the symptoms develop quickly, can continue even at rest, and can carry on for up to 30 minutes.
  • The symptoms of unstable angina might also be unaffected to treatment with glyceryl trinitrate.
  • The symptoms of unstable angina can also take place in individuals who do not have a prior history of stable angina.
  • Unstable angina should be considered a medical emergency because it is a sign that heart has unexpectedly and quickly worsened, increasing your danger of having a heart attack or stroke.
  • Unstable angina can be managed with prescription tablets and surgery.

 Related Video On Angina

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5RefHjfcOo

 

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  • All lifeguardfirstaid.ca content is reviewed by a medical professional and / sourced to ensure as much factual accuracy as possible.

  • We have strict sourcing guidelines and only link to reputable websites, academic research institutions and medical articles.

  • If you feel that any of our content is inaccurate, out-of-date, or otherwise questionable, please contact us through our contact us page.